Chronos is a distributed task scheduler (cf. cron) for the Mesos cluster management system. In this edition of Jepsen, we’ll see how simple network interruptions can permanently disrupt a Chronos+Mesos cluster

Chronos relies on Mesos, which has two flavors of node: master nodes, and slave nodes. Ordinarily in Jepsen we’d refer to these as “primary” and “secondary” or “leader” and “follower” to avoid connotations of, well, slavery, but the master nodes themselves form a cluster with leaders and followers, and terms like “executor” have other meanings in Mesos, so I’m going to use the Mesos terms here.

Mesos slaves connect to masters and offer resources like CPU, disk, and memory. Masters take those offers and make decisions about resource allocation using frameworks like Chronos. Those decisions are sent to slaves, which actually run tasks on their respective nodes. Masters form a replicated state machine with a persistent log. Both masters and slaves rely on Zookeeper for coordination and discovery. Zookeeper is also a replicated persistent log.

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